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The Future of GTS

Students share their experience during this time of change. 

As part of our series, General Stories, we asked some students to write about the future of GTS especially as it pertains to their individual experiences.


Ian Kinman
MDiv Senior
Just the other day I read an article in The New York Times about how General was planning on selling the entire 9th Avenue campus, and moving to a new location. Of course, that article was published on January 28, 1880. It was a reminder to me that GTS has faced seemingly insurmountable problems, financial and otherwise, for its entire history, and will undoubtedly continue to do so. Nevertheless, it has survived, thrived, and grown during that entire time, adjusting to new situations and new realities.
As a student, I have the privilege of witnessing how the Seminary has been able to accomplish this wonderful feat. I have seen an astonishingly passionate and motivated group of students provide the energy and vision of what a seminary and a seminary education can be. I have witnessed a supremely dedicated faculty that pushes the boundaries of what teaching can be, while maintaining a vital historic tradition. Moreover, I have enjoyed working alongside a dedicated administration and staff whose only motivation is to keep the Seminary growing and thriving against challenging odds.
Of course, the future role our residential seminaries play in theological education involves decisions that must be made in dialogue with the entire Episcopal Church. Other aspects of seminary education will also need to be addressed, including the use of online technologies and the expansion of degrees, such as the MA,  to further allow opportunity for educating the laity in their callings and ministries.
I will be graduating this spring, hopefully continuing my academic studies of the Bible at another institution. I value my time spent here. The General Theological Seminary has given me  enormous opportunities for study and reflection.
I will leave the Close with fond memories of the wonderful times past, and with excitement for a promising future. As well, I will leave with pride in being part of a proud tradition, and with confidence that in the hands of current, and future, students, faculty, administration and staff, that proud tradition will continue forward.

Kinman_web 
Ian Kinman

M.A.

Just the other day I read an article in The New York Times about how General was planning on selling the entire 9th Avenue campus, and moving to a new location. Of course, that article was published on January 28, 1880. It was a reminder to me that GTS has faced seemingly insurmountable problems, financial and otherwise, for its entire history, and will undoubtedly continue to do so. Nevertheless, it has survived, thrived, and grown during that entire time, adjusting to new situations and new realities.

As a student, I have the privilege of witnessing how the Seminary has been able to accomplish this wonderful feat. I have seen an astonishingly passionate and motivated group of students provide the energy and vision of what a seminary and a seminary education can be. I have witnessed a supremely dedicated faculty that pushes the boundaries of what teaching can be, while maintaining a vital historic tradition. Moreover, I have enjoyed working alongside a dedicated administration and staff whose only motivation is to keep the Seminary growing and thriving against challenging odds.

Of course, the future role our residential seminaries play in theological education involves decisions that must be made in dialogue with the entire Episcopal Church. Other aspects of seminary education will also need to be addressed, including the use of online technologies and the expansion of degrees, such as the MA,  to further allow opportunity for educating the laity in their callings and ministries.

I will be graduating this spring, hopefully continuing my academic studies of the Bible at another institution. I value my time spent here. The General Theological Seminary has given me  enormous opportunities for study and reflection. I will leave the Close with fond memories of the wonderful times past, and with excitement for a promising future. As well, I will leave with pride in being part of a proud tradition, and with confidence that in the hands of current, and future, students, faculty, administration and staff, that proud tradition will continue forward.

Richard-Proctor_web 
Richard Proctor 

Anglican Studies 

For me the title of Elizabeth Gilbert’s bestselling 2006 memoir sums up three central values of General Seminary:  Eat, Pray, and Love.  Although  GTS is best known for its chapel, liturgy, and tradition, after six short months here, I believe that the best thing we have going for us is our community.  I love that we have a free community meal on Tuesday nights, as well as coffee and bagels every morning after worship.  A seminary that eats together grows together.  I also love that there are four opportunities every day for us to gather as a community to pray for the world, the Close, and everybody and everything in between.  

The seminary that prays together stays together. And I’ll never forget after one of my first Tuesday evening Eucharist services, everybody was gathered around the outside of the chapel.  I wondered why everybody wasn’t heading to get in line for the community meal in Hoffman Hall.  Then a huge roar of applause erupted, and I turned to notice that the students were cheering for Jeff Roy, who had just preached his senior sermon during the service.  While many graduate schools are plagued by competition among the students, I realized then that GTS is blessed with students who love one another.  The seminary that loves together heals together.  I honestly trust the administration, board, and faculty to do their part to ensure that GTS has a bright future. I have a great deal of trust in and respect for our new President and Dean. But that can only happen if we continue to eat, pray, and love.

How I Spent My Summer Vacation

Kimberly Rowles. m.Div '13 shares her experience as a summer intern at Seamen's Church Institute


Kim_Rowles_webWhen I was a child, I spent my summers “down the shore” in Wildwood, NJ. I had no idea at the time that in Newark and Elizabeth, less than 150 miles from where I built sandcastles, nearly everything that I would need, want, or buy was being lifted off container ships. This year, instead of going “down the shore”, I found myself going down to the port, and this is where I spent my summer break from General Theological Seminary.

In the past 3 months, I’ve visited an average of two ships a day, three days a week—about 54 ships. Since most ships’ crews are about 20-24 people strong, I impacted the lives of over 1,000 seafarers either directly or indirectly. That sounds pretty impressive until you think about the hundreds of thousands of seafarers on the ocean every day. These men and women work 24/7/365 to bring us our “stuff,” and yet most consumers do not know them at all.

As I sit down to reflect on my summer of climbing up gangways, selling phone cards, transporting seafarers to Jersey Gardens shopping mall and sitting in the newly remodeled seafarers’ center, I recall speaking with a Chief Mate. In the midst of our hour-long conversation, he told Chaplain Megan Sanders and me that he felt like we were “real people.” Living on the ship is almost like living in a hotel—meals are provided; beds are clean, dry and warm. The only thing that you have to give up is … everything. You see the same faces for four, six, ten months. You never see your family. You do not have a normal life. But you do this because you need to—because you have parents and siblings and wives and children to whom you send the money that you make on board ship.

During my time at SCI, the chaplains and I helped seafarers feel like “real people.” We worked to extend a welcoming handshake or hug. We provided tools that allowed individuals to call, Skype or email home. We sold phone cards and SIM cards—I now know more about cell phone plans than I ever thought I would. We looked every seafarer in the eye and recognized his or her humanity. Chaplains don’t think about the port in terms of export and import; rather, we look at the port as full of strangers and friends.

I believe SCI fulfills the mission Christ commanded his disciples to assume, acting each day and in every way in an honest and reciprocal way. I feel privileged to have worked at SCI for this summer break. I have learned more about hospitality and community in these three months from seafarers and the chaplains who serve them than I can express in a few short paragraphs. Thank you, SCI, for showing me how to be a better Christian in my daily life and work.

 

 

This essay originally appeared on the Seamen's Church Institute web site. It is used with permission from the author. The original can be found here.

 

A History of General Seminary


Although it is frequently dropped in informal reference, the tiny article "the" in the Seminary’s name is an important reminder of the institution’s broader origin. For the Seminary was intended from the beginning to be a Church-wide resource for the whole Episcopal Church which created it.

In 1814, with American victory in the War of 1812 having brought final freedom from European entanglements, the Diocese of South Carolina, with a burst of national vision, proposed the founding of a theological institution that would belong to the whole Episcopal Church. Dioceses would share responsibility for the maintenance of one institution of learning. Students from all parts of the country who came to the school to study for the priesthood would experience close and lasting association with one another. It was hoped that in these ways the Church's general seminary would strengthen the bonds of affection among the Church's dioceses.

Bound up in its very name, service to the Episcopal Church nationwide became central to the Seminary’s heritage. In 1817 the General Convention met in New York City and on May 26-27 these two Resolutions passed both Houses:

  • That it is expedient to establish a General Theological Seminary which may have the united support of the whole Church in the United States and be under the superintendence and control of the General Convention.
  • That the Seminary be located in the City of New York.

This location in New York City quickly became General’s greatest asset. First, the parishioners of Trinity Church, Wall Street, who provided the financial underpinning of the nineteenth century renewal of American Anglicanism, also generously supported its new General Seminary.

 

In 1821 Jacob Sherred, a vestry member of Trinity Parish, provided $70,000 in his will to endow "a General Episcopal Seminary in New York City." This was enough to make General one of the best-endowed seminaries in the nation. Another Trinity parishioner who made a significant contribution to the Seminary was Clement Clarke Moore, famous as author of the poem which begins, "’Twas the night before Christmas." He owned a large estate in Chelsea, which at that time was an undeveloped area of Manhattan, north of the city--in Moore’s own words, "a quiet, rural retreat on the picturesque banks of the Hudson." He offered a tract of 66 lots on his Chelsea estate to the Church on condition that a seminary be built there. General was not able to occupy Moore’s lots until 1827 when an East Building was erected. When the student body had grown to 64 in 1836, the West Building was erected to house 60 students.

Another advantage of locating the Seminary in the Diocese of New York was its bishop, John Henry Hobart. In Chelsea Square Bishop Hobart wished to restore the ancient pattern of the bishop as teacher surrounded by representative voices of the whole Church. The Seminary professor who happened to be a bishop would preside over meetings of the faculty. Hobart did this himself until 1830; his successor as Bishop of New York followed the pattern into the 1850s. There was no real Dean of the seminary until the 1860s.

In addition to the clergy, Hobart now also appointed two laypersons to make the faculty more representative: Clement Clarke Moore, a linguist and Hebrew scholar who undertook instruction in Biblical languages, and Gulian Verplanck, a gifted and eccentric New York legislator who was appointed Professor of Evidences of Revealed Religion and Moral Science.

Bishop Hobart believed that this corporate and representative body, in union with the Bishop as president, shared collectively in the ministry of defending and interpreting the Apostolic Faith to the nation. He wrote of the Seminary in 1825:

Harmony, union, vigour, zeal, like the life-blood of the human frame, are thus sent from this heart of our system, into every part of the spiritual body.... Strength arising from... the primitive truth and order which the apostles proclaimed and established.

The challenge since the 1840s has been to combine the richness and variety which emerged from later patterns of Episcopal theological education with the idealistic vision of the earlier Hobartian era, a vision born out of the time of the adjustment of Anglicanism to the new cultural dynamic of democracy.

Throughout its history and today, General has sought to be a seminary of the whole church, and that vision has been extended to include the ecumenical community and the Anglican Communion. Diverse theological, liturgical and spiritual emphases of successive periods have found a home here, and the community aspires to reflect the richness of the whole People of God.


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The General Theological Seminary believes academics, worship, and life in community are inseparable elements in the process of formation for ministry in Christ's church, whether lay or ordained. Services in our Chapel include the Eucharist, Morning and Evening Prayer, and Compline. While students who live on campus are free to develop their own individual routines, nearly all worship in our Chapel as a part of their daily life, as do faculty members and many members of the staff. Everyone may take further part, whether as sacristans, acolytes, readers or members of the Seminary's choir.

 

GTS treasures the diversity of its community. While most students are preparing for ordination or ministry as lay persons, many students come to General for personal growth in their spiritual lives.  Although a majority of our students study full-time and live on campus, we also have a growing number of part-time and commuter students. The student body is nearly equally divided between women and men and an equal number of single persons and married or partnered couples. About 8% of GTS students are from racial groups that are often under-represented and a significant number of our students, staff and faculty are gay or lesbian. 

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The median age of our students is between 30 and 40. Many students have children and for them the Seminary offers a safe and beautiful outdoor environment as well as an on-campus preschool. Inclusivity at GTS also means special organizations for women, people of color, and GLBT students, and student-run ministries that provide clothing to the disadvantaged and a shelter for six homeless persons each weekday night.

While known for its rigorous academic standards, General also focuses on the needs of each individual student. Close relationships between those who teach and those who learn are furthered by common worship, meals, and social events. Learning thus becomes a highly collaborative endeavor. GTS offers a faculty/student ratio of about 1:12 and faculty members each have a small group of student advisees with whom they meet regularly, both individually and in groups. In addition to regular coursework, opportunities for learning abound with special lectures and international conferences at the Seminary's Desmond Tutu Center, which has greatly enhanced General's standing as an international forum for the Anglican Communion. Through the Center, the Seminary actively seeks to make vital connections between the enterprise of theological education and the world of science, commerce, and the arts.

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General believes the Anglican expression of Christianity can inform and challenge the pressing issues of our day.

 

Students find a rich social life within the GTS community, and the Seminary's location in the heart of New York City offers a truly amazing array of recreational offerings, as well.  The cultural opportunities found in this most international of cities are unparalleled. Along with General's worship, academic, and community life, the many cultural and recreational activities of New York combine to make General a unique educational environment.

 

Accredited by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada, and the following degree programs are approved: MDiv, MA in Spiritual Direction, MA, STM, & ThD.

 

The Commission contact information is as follows:

The Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools
in the United States and Canada
10 Summit Park Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15275 USA
Telephone: 412-788-6505
Fax: 412-788-6510
Website: www.ats.edu

 

All of its degree programs comply with the standards of the New York State Education Department, and are officially listed by the department’s Office of College and University Evaluation as meeting or exceeding its “minimum quality standards.” For more information see our catalog.


cc-moore-smallerGeneral Seminary's mission, to educate and form leaders for the church in a changing world, has been a central focus throughout its long history.  Chartered by General Convention in 1817, General's very name was chosen to reflect the intention of its founders: that it would serve the entire Episcopal Church. Church leaders, with a burst of national vision, conceived a theological institution that would belong to the whole Episcopal Church, where students from all parts of the country would come to prepare for ordination.

east-west-etchAn important milestone occurred in 1819.  Clement Clarke Moore, who would later become a professor at General, but who is best known as the author of the poem which begins, "Twas the night before Christmas," gave a large parcel of land, an apple orchard, to the Church on condition that a seminary be built there.  The land stood on the west side of Manhattan close to the Hudson River.  East Building, the Seminary's first home, was erected in 1827 and was joined in 1836, by West Building, built  to house 60 students.  The Seminary's location in New York City quickly proved to be a great asset and defining characteristic.

chapel-etchThroughout its history General has followed its mandate to be a seminary of the whole church, a vision that has broadened to include the ecumenical community, the Anglican Communion, the City of New York, our country, and our world.  Toward the end of the 19th century Dean Eugene Augustus Hoffman began an ambitious building program, dubbed in the press as "Dean Hoffman's Grand Design."' 

 

Dodge_Hall_L1000255By erecting a series of stately brick buildings--dormitories, faculty apartments, and a classroom building--around the perimeter of the block, a magnificent  quadrangle or  "Close," after the fashion of English universities, was created. At its center was the jewel of the Dean's design, the Chapel of the Good Shepherd. Between the 1930's and 60's several other more modern buildings were added including a new library.

 

Since 1822 General has graduated over 7,000 men and women. Our worldwide alumni/ae now total approximately 2,400. GTS graduates serve primarily in the Episcopal Church. In recent decades  an increasing number of GTS students are preparing for serving Christ as lay persons along side those who plan to be ordained.

Click here for a more detailed looked at General Seminary's interesting past.

 

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THE GENERAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
440 West 21st Street, New York City, NY 10011   |   tel (212) 243-5150  fax (212) 727-3907

The General Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church is a tax exempt organization under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

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